How to Prove Income for Child or Spousal Support in Michigan

One of the most difficult parts of divorce for a parent is seeing their kids go through the trauma of losing the stability of the family unit, and often, the family home.  For a parent unable to provide in

the same manner the children are used to, a divorce can be particularly fraught with doubt.  If you rely on a spouse’s income during marriage, you may be uncertain about how you will provide for children following divorce.

This is where alimony and child support enter the picture.  Whether your ex-spouse gets joint custody or you receive full custody, you may be eligible for financial support to ensure that your children don’t have to go without necessities like food, shelter, clothing, and medical care, even if you’re not fully capable of meeting these material needs on your own.

There is a formula in place to calculate such payments, but it relies on information regarding your spouse’s income.  How do you prove income in order to receive the alimony and/or spousal support you’re due?

Know What Counts as Income

Once you’ve separated marital assets and debts in your divorce proceedings, you can move on to spousal support and alimony payments.  How are these amounts calculated?  Many factors are taken into account, including the income of both spouses, and if children are involved, the number of children, the amount of parenting time each spouse claims, and the costs of healthcare and child care, among other things.

Income could include not only wages, but also any earnings from a business, rental properties, or even investments.  In some cases, income could also include bonuses, commissions, deferred compensation, and even annuities and pension benefits.  Naturally, you’ll want a thorough accounting of all forms of income your spouse receives, but your spouse may not be totally forthcoming.

Hire a Qualified Lawyer

Your ex-spouse may try to lie about income in order to pay you less than you are entitled to following divorce.  People can get very crafty about this and you may not have the resources to prove otherwise.  This is why you need an experienced lawyer to help you uncover the truth.

Your attorney has the power to subpoena relevant records to prove income, including tax filings from past years, bank account and credit card statements, and information on mortgages, car payments, and other assets and debts.  With this information, your attorney can create a picture of what your spouse is earning and spending, and how he/she is living a lifestyle in general, regardless of false claims of income woes.

This can be particularly useful if your ex-spouse is self-employed and trying to fudge tax filings.  If he/she claims significantly lower earnings since the divorce, taxes from past years can prove income trends and earning potential, or even attempts to lie about income and evade spousal or child support payments. With the right information, the court can make a sound ruling, hopefully in your favor.

If you need help proving income for the purposes of child or spousal support, contact the qualified attorneys at The Gucciardo Law Firm today at 248-723-5190.

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We focus exclusively on family law matters so we are always available to answer your questions and help.

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